Tending to Transition

By: Sonja Van Hala, MD, MPH, FAAFP As I embark on a new era in my professional life, I am giving attention to how to transition. Over the last twelve years as residency program director, I worked alongside remarkable and dedicated faculty and residents. I am immensely grateful for all I learned from them. Now, as … Continue reading Tending to Transition

Stu

By: Peter V. Sundwall Jr. Every small community has a unique but similar cast of characters. Our small Southern Utah town was no different. From a young boy’s perspective, the cops and docs were feared but cautiously idolized, the mayor was respected, the athletic coaches were immortalized, and of course, we had the homeless man … Continue reading Stu

How to get to 100

By: Jose Rodriguez, MD Two years ago, I took my entire family to San Sebastian de Las Vegas del Pepino, Puerto Rico to celebrate my maternal grandmother’s (Abuela Orpa) 100th birthday. We had a wonderful time and it made me realize that there is a real possibility that I might have my own mother with … Continue reading How to get to 100

I Believe There’s No Such Thing as Work-Life Balance

By: Katherine Fortenberry, PhD Previously published June 7, 2013, on the CFHA Blog I believe there’s no such thing as work-life balance. I think this every morning when I leave for work, watching my two-year-old son press his face against the front window and wave at me as I back down the driveway. It comes … Continue reading I Believe There’s No Such Thing as Work-Life Balance

“Bad News:” Any information which adversely and seriously affects an individual’s view of his or her future.

I teach Physician Assistant (PA) students the art of the medical interview and this morning had just finished teaching the lecture entitled, “Delivering Bad News.”  I walked the students through the S.P.I.K.E.S model, encouraging them to plan out the Setting, think about the patient Perception, get an Invitation from the patient to present information, impart … Continue reading “Bad News:” Any information which adversely and seriously affects an individual’s view of his or her future.

Navigating Life in Family Medicine is Like a Good Mystery Novel

By Erika Sullivan, MD Family medicine is an interesting and wonderful landscape to spend one’s days. Like a good mystery novel, there is an abundance of unusual but endearing characters, treacherous villains (with alarmingly medical names like diabetes and anxiety NOS) and more insidious and unexpected foes, such as poverty and social injustice. When treating … Continue reading Navigating Life in Family Medicine is Like a Good Mystery Novel