Keeping Watch

By: Rebecca Curran, MD, PhD Minor demographic and medical details have been changed to protect patient privacy. It is my third year of medical school, my first year seeing actual patients, and I am being handed my “list” for the day. “We’re giving you Mira, a 6-year-old Serbian girl, bad cancer, kind of complicated.” “Kind … Continue reading Keeping Watch

Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy

To clarify the intentionally click-bait title (and also rivetingly poetic phrase by the distinguished lyricist/rapper Big Daddy Kane): the definition of pimping in the medical field is different than the colloquial usage by artists like Jay-Z, Snoop, and Kendrick Lamar. Although most people are aware of pimping in the vernacular language (which will not be … Continue reading Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy

The Case for Personal Resilience Strategies in Changing the Focus from Burnout to Wellbeing

By: Amy Locke, MD, FAAFP Physician well-being is a major focus of many physician organizations and is frequently highlighted in popular media.  Some have described the root of the problem as a disconnect between expectation and reality.  This is a helpful framework for situations that result in disappointment.  I recently rented a house on Airbnb. Eagerly … Continue reading The Case for Personal Resilience Strategies in Changing the Focus from Burnout to Wellbeing

Just Get the Evaluation

By: Katherine Fortenberry, PhD My daughter was a beautiful, happy, chubby baby – who couldn’t sit independently until 10 months. Or crawl until 11 months. And didn’t have any words yet at 12 months. I’d taken enough child development classes to know that she wasn’t hitting the milestones. But when my daughter’s doctor encouraged me … Continue reading Just Get the Evaluation

It’s more than luck: Learning from Imposter Syndrome

By: Anna Holman, MD When people ask me what I do for work and hear that I'm a family medicine resident, they often follow-up with “So, are you a doctor?” My answer is usually “Technically, yes...” I still feel a little odd introducing myself as a doctor. I can’t quite own it, despite years of working … Continue reading It’s more than luck: Learning from Imposter Syndrome

Don’t ask “what is wrong with you.” Ask “what happened to you.”

By: Bernadette Kiraly, MD She had resettled in Utah from Africa as a refugee, fleeing a horrific past where she witnessed her husband's murdered and she was beaten by soldiers. I prepared myself for the onslaught of pain complaints with the unreasonable expectation that I was going to fix it for her. I knew her … Continue reading Don’t ask “what is wrong with you.” Ask “what happened to you.”